Review by Monique from BooksOnline

 

 Moniquejm » 21 Sep 2017
 

“Men as Virgins” is a non-fiction and a memoir book by A. Delaney Walker writing as Zola Lawrence. It was mentioned that everything in this book is emotionally true and hopefully as factually true as possible. This book was previously published as “Virgins! A memoir of the Sexual Revolution” in 2006 and this revised edition released in 2016.

Zola started dating and being involved with different men when her first love announced through a letter that he is already getting married to another woman and he is also entering the military. Zolathen started exploring the psychology of male virginity and writing love letters to these men she loved.

In this story, Zola wonders what makes a man stay with a woman and vice-versa. Having got through with many relationships, she has the feeling of being afraid to care for a man again and afraid to invest feelings with a man. Zola is also trying to figure it out if can sex is love or can love be sex or simultaneously the same. Take a journey with Zola with the different men in her best and worst time of life by reading this book as she explores and studies the psychology of virgin men.

At first, I expect this book “Men as Virgins” contains a lot of graphic sex scenes but I found only a few until the end of this book. This story is a good source of information and it educates readers about relationship and sex. Every person should realize that before having sex with someone, there should be meaning or feeling of love involved. We should learn not to give everything to our partner. We should be able also to determine who really care and love us from those who are not.

Zola in this story has a strong character, independent, adventurer, and a survivor. This book is really relevant for today’s young liberated adult’s generation. It will bring knowledge to the readers about the different characteristics of men and how men handle women in different ways.

The book was a combination of sex, betrayal, romance, love, poverty, family, drugs, birth control, and adventure. I said adventure because Zola went to many places in this journey like Vietnam, Washington, London, British, Chicago and more.

Every chapter, the author introduced the person who is involved with Zola and the exact year the story happened. However, the presentation of years confused me because a specific year was mentioned in three chapters. I still need to go back to the previous chapter/s to check who she met and have a relationship first among the men.

My final rating for this book is 3 out of 4 stars. This book can be recommended to those who are liberated and open minded to sex. To those who are conservative people, you may consider this book if you want to learn about relationships, love, and sex but prepare your emotion and stamina before reading.